Expectativas y motivación en la transición de rol en el servicio social de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Expectations and motivation during role transition in the "Social Service" year at the Faculty of Medicine, National Autonomous University of Mexico
Margarita Varela-Ruiza, Alicia Hamui-Suttonb, Jesús Reynaga-Obregónc, Jesús Reynaga-Obregónd,Jesús Reynaga-Obregóne, Omar Fernando Ramírez-de la Rochef, Omar Fernando Ramírez-de la Rocheg

a Jefa del Departamento de Investigación en Educación Médica de la Secretaría de Educación Médica, Facultad de Medicina, UNAM.
b Jefa del Departamento de Investigación Educativa. División de Estudios de Posgrado. Facultad de Medicina, UNAM.
c Profesor de Carrera, Tiempo Completo "A" en el Departamento de Salud Pública, Facultad de Medicina, UNAM.
d Coordinación de Planes y Programas de Estudio. Facultad de Medicina, UNAM.
e Coordinadora de Planes y Programas de Estudio. Facultad de Medicina, UNAM.
f Departamento de Investigación Educativa. División de Estudios de Posgrado. Facultad de Medicina, UNAM.
g Departamento de Investigación Educativa. División de Estudios de Posgrado. Facultad de Medicina, UNAM.

Recepción 25 de septiembre de 2011; aceptación 20 de octubre de 2011

Palabras Clave

Servicio social; Rol; Motivación; Médicos pasantes; Expectativas.

Keywords

Social service; Role; Motivation; Medical interns in social service; Expectations.

Abstract

Introduction: Once having completed their medical internship at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) Faculty of Medicine, students start a mandatory community service. Social service locations are available in rural or urban locations and in different health institutions, leading to diversity of experience.

Objective: This study sought to determine whether the complex adjustment to the new role, in which MPSSs by themselves perform the medical act as professionals, allows them to meet their expectations and motivations.

Methods: In the 2009-2010 academic year, 814 students from the UNAM Faculty of Medicine, performed their social service. A link to access the survey was e-mailed to students and answers were registered online. The instrument contained several sections.

Results: More than a third (36.7%) of the MPSS did not feel motivated to perform social service activities, which made the achievement of their purposes difficult. 75.5% of those in urban locations mentioned meeting their expectations while this was stated by fewer of those in rural areas (65.3%). 22.8% from all MPSS had thought about quitting the role they were playing. When asked how they perceived the value of their work, most MPSS (93.9%) felt they had given something to those around. When asked if they enjoyed working at the health unit, more than a quarter (27.5%) of those in rural areas said they were not.

Conclusions: Most MPSS (94.2%) were satisfied with the social service and stated their identity had changed. However, about a third of MPSS had problems with motivation, fulfillment of expectations, and academic training opportunities, for all of which an association regarding their location (rural or urban) was found.